Sites you can use to look for work while you’re on the road

When you’re on the road, it’s hard to hold down a traditional job, but a bit of extra cash to avoid depleting your savings is never a bad thing. So where do you look for this type of work?
The following sites are just some of the available options, depending on your skillsets. Please feel free to comment and add your own that you’ve found worthwhile.

Skills-matching type websites:

These are websites which list a range of jobs that people want done and usually, a guide on what they’re willing to pay. While the most well-known is Airtasker (www.airtasker.com), others that you might like to check out include: fiverr (www.fiverr.com), mturk (amazon mechanical turk, www.mturk.com), craigslist (www.craigslist), upwork (www.upwork.com/local/australia/) or one shift (www.au.oneshiftjobs.com).  If you have a trade, consider registering for hi pages (www.hipages.com.au), or for elance (www.elance.com), freelancer (www.freelancer.com), or hubstaff talent (www.talent.hubstaff.com) if you have mad skills in website design, marketing, proofreading, writing or executive assistant/virtual assistant type roles. Just remember to look after your own safety and look for well rated listers as there are certainly scammers and people with ill-intent active on these sites.

Art and/or Photography sales sites:

If you have some awesome pictures or art you’re willing to sell, there are a range of websites where people can buy your art/photographs. Some of the photography sites also offer a range of merchandise (so someone can buy a mug with your fabulous picture of the Great Ocean Road on it without you having to do a thing other than upload your file). Art sites popular in Australia include Art Lovers Australia (www.artloversaustralia.com.au), State of heart gallery (www.stateofheartgallery.com.au), and BlueThumb (www.bluethumb.com.au). Just make sure you read and understand their rules regarding intellectual property/copyright, fees, commissions, and any obligations you have to promote the site. For photography, there are heaps of sites: smugmug (www.smugmug.com), Alamy (www.alamy.com), Shutterstock (www.shutterstock.com), and iStock (www.istockphoto.com/au). The plethora of sites available means that competition to be seen, let alone sold is getting tougher, so make sure that you do some basic research into the types of images that sell, have good enough equipment to reproduce those sort, and quality of images, and that you protect your images from misappropriation.

Survey-taking sites:

If you are looking for something with less time commitment, perhaps sign up to one of the many survey-taking websites. Generally, these sites are seeking answers for companies on purchasing habits, brand awareness, or sometimes social or political views. It’s up to you which surveys you click through to, and what you disclose, but note that some don’t pay in cash (they pay in vouchers), and they only pay if you answer all the questions. Some local examples include: mint (www.mintsurveys.com.au), swagbucks (www.swagbucks.com), my survey Australia (www.mysurvey.net.au), and ipoll (www.ipoll.com). Oh, and you’re probably not going to get rich taking surveys, but it does help pay the petrol bill.

Other sites:

There are literally thousands of micro-work sites out there that cater to niche jobs. Sell your clothes on consignment on ThredUp (www.thredup.com), listen to music for cash on Slice the pie (www.slicethepie.com), sell arts/crafts on Etsy (www.etsy.com/au), set up your own drop-shipping company on ebay (www.ebay.com), or play video games for cash on cashpirate (www.cashpirate.mobi)… it is definitely a buyers and sellers world out there, and now, more than ever, if you have a laptop or tablet, you too can (afford to) travel.

 

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